Australia Work and Holiday: How to Plan Your Year-Long Travel

Going on a year-long travel without much of a plan is simply going to make it so much more inconvenient for you. Despite the thought that you think of yourself as someone who “make it up as you go”, having a plan, or at least a semblance of plan, is how you should go about your work and holiday trip. 

What do you want out of your work and holiday? 

So many people went on a work and holiday quite impulsively. The ease and simplicity in getting this visa makes this visa option so easy to “fall into”. No matter where you plan to go in Australia for your year-long travel, having a semblance of plan is important. But first, think why you’re going on a work and holiday in the first place. What do you want to get out of from this one year journey? Is it to visit as many place as possible? Or do you want to stay in one area and get to know the place more intimately? Ask this to yourself so that your goals and aims are clear. This would also help you land jobs that are more suited to your travel objectives 

Do your research—nope, no such a thing as too much research

Knowing ahead of time of the overall aspects of your one year life in Australia is going to save you from so much headache and inconvenience. To start off, after you’ve determined what you want to get out of your year-long Australia travel, you can try asking yourself these:

  • Where do you want to go in Australia? 
  • What sort of jobs are available for travelers like you in that area?
  • How much does accommodation cost? 
  • What are your options for accommodation? 
  • Is it realistic to do all of your travel plans with how much you earn?  

To start off, have sufficient funds with you!

This prevents you from becoming desperate to get a job because you’re too broke to travel. The Australian government actually requires you to have at least 5,000 AUD when you arrive in Australia. It will set you off with enough funds until you land a job—and not just any job. But a decent job with a decent pay. And it’s always good to have your CV or resume ready. Having a CV or resume ready to hand out to employers is going to save you time and headache. Make sure to print them out. Prepare more than one CV, you’re going to need to put only relevant experiences to the relevant CVs. 

Have an idea of where you’d like to go—but be flexible

With the entire year to yourself, you’ll have plenty of time to explore the Land Down Under. Over-planning can be a waste of time—especially if you have a ton of places on your list. You’re going to need to work to fund your travel. People have had experiences where they ended up staying longer in one place. And that doesn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. It can be that you’ve met some really wonderful travelers that you don’t want to leave behind so soon. Or that you’ve got quite an awesome job for a backpacker that you’re going to want to stay for a couple more months. 

How to Find Work as a Backpacker in Australia?

This visa option for traveling to Australia is popular with students on a gap year as well as many young travelers alike. Bringing enough funds is recommended by the Australian government (the immigration states 5,000 AUD to be sufficient). Finding work within the first month of your arrival in the Oz is what a lot of people do when they are on a working holiday visa. What do you need to do or prepare when you’ve decided to pack your bag and leave for the land down under?

Get your CV or resume ready 

Don’t pile up all of your experiences into one huge CVs. Just like when you’re applying to any other job, only list relevant experiences on your CV. Have separate CVs or resumes for each type of job that you have experiences of. 

These are some of the most common CVs many travelers usually prepare, according to the types of job: 

  • Hospitality CV or resume (this often extend to jobs in retail)
  • Office temp jobs 
  • Labor work (housekeeping, farming, etc.)

It’s better to print your CVs back home. This will save you so much headache from trying to find a printer or a copy machine when you’ve just arrived, jet-lagged, and basically just need to settle down first. Have at least a couple of physical copies of each of your CV ready and have the digital file ready on your phone or on your flash drive. 

Research the types of jobs that you can apply to during your travel 

Some people are stuck in awful jobs below minimum pay just because they don’t do any preparation or prior research. Most people end up with fruit picking and got stuck there simply because they didn’t know better or did not network better. 

Some research before you arrive in Australia will let you know the types of jobs you can apply to, even though you may not be able to land such a job straight away. It’s noteworthy that most employers would prefer someone who’s already in Australia. But it never hurt to research your options. You can also visit your hostel’s message board. They usually have something for the travelers and even their own job opening that would let you have free accommodation and sometimes, meal. 

Internet is still going to be your best friend 

There are all sorts of place people post their job ads to. From a dedicated website for headhunting to social media. Utilize what you’ve got to get the best out of your backpacker job search. Join facebook groups relevant to your area. This will not only yield you jobs but possibly give you a networking opportunity with fellow working holiday makers. 

Some of the sites you can try are as follows: 

  • Gumtree 
  • Working Holiday Jobs
  • Seek
  • Backpacker Job Board
  • Au.Indeed 
  • Hunter Labour Hire
  • Airtasker 
  • Harvest Trail 

Sometimes it’s not what you know, but who you know 

This cliche old saying still applies. So it never hurt to network, network, network. You’re not the only traveler looking for work here in the land down under. Loads of people are in the same boat as you. While that sometimes mean more competition, it also means that a lot of information is usually flying around. It’s up to you to catch a wind of it.